How does EMDR work?
 
No-one knows how any form of psychotherapy works neuro-biologically or in the brain. However, we do know that when a person is very upset, their brain cannot process information as it does ordinarily. One moment becomes "frozen in time", and remembering a trauma or flashback may feel as bad as going through it the first time, because the images, sounds, smells, and feelings haven't changed. This can have a lasting and negative effect on people's mental health.

EMDR seems to have a direct effect on the way that the brain processes information. Normal information processing is resumed, so following a successful EMDR session, a person no longer relives the images, sounds, and the feelings when the event is brought to mind. You still remember what happened but it is less upsetting. EMDR appears to be similar to what occurs naturally when during dreaming or REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. Therefore, EMDR can be thought of as a physiologically based therapy that helps a person see disturbing material in a new and less distressing way.



 
 
 
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 claire

About me

Claire Gillingham

CBT & EMDR PRACTITIONER

I am a Registered Mental Health Nurse (RMN) and have worked in the NHS for the last 27 years, working currently as an Independent Nurse Prescriber.

I have extensive experience working with all ages with a wide variety of mental health difficulties using CBT since 1999. I have an accredited masters level diploma in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) from Exeter University and I am an accredited BABCP practitioner

I undertake regular supervision with an accredited supervisor, as well as undergoing an annual criminal record bureau (CRB) check. I am also an Eye Movement Desensitisation Reprocessing (EMDR) practitioner with full membership of the UK & Ireland EMDR association.


 

Site content copyright Claire Gillingham 2012.